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Property tax reforms mean higher bills for some

CBC
Kevin Lacey said Local Government Minister Bruce Fitch was in a "can't win situation" with his property tax reform proposals. (CBC)

Kevin Lacey said Local Government Minister Bruce Fitch was in a "can't win situation" with his property tax reform proposals. (CBC)


The Canadian Taxpayers Federation says New Brunswick's new approach to property taxes will mean higher bills for people who live in fast-growing urban areas, such as Dieppe.



Local Government Minister Bruce Fitchreleased a discussion document on property tax reform that called for a number of changes on Wednesday.

Kevin Lacey, the Atlantic director for the taxpayers federation, said the most significant change that will affect the largest number of citizens is the elimination of the three per cent property assessment cap, which was introduced two years ago.

The cap has given homeowners and homebuyers a degree of security, he said.

“So if you go and you're going to buy a house in Riverview tomorrow, you would know generally what you're going to pay in taxes over the coming years,” Lacey said.

The changes don't deal with rising assessments, which are used to calculate property taxes, so there could be major jumps in taxes, he said.



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